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Queries in Training

I was asked a few questions on Training. I replied to them and thought would be interesting for my blog readers too. (This is from an India perspective)


1. what should one do to get into training sector?

Depends on why you want to be in this field and what's your personal vision.


Various ways you can get into this field:

a. You could start by conducting sessions in schools and colleges. And then move on to training the entry level staff of companies.

b. Join a Company in the Learning & Development Department (part of HR). You may have to initially get into coordination of Training and may be more of an observer. This would strengthen your content knowledge. Once you are comfortable in the modules, then you could start by handling small modules along with a co-trainer.

c. Join a Training Company. Again initially they may put you in co-ordination. They may also ask you to first start marketing (i.e. developing business). Then again you may get chances to co-facilitate and thus become a Trainer. They would also certify you on certain key programs in the long run.

If you want to directly get into freelancing and expect companies to give you assignments, I don't know 'why' they will give the same to you. Training is a cost and should give the client Return on their Investment.


are there any courses or diploma available?

ISTD runs a Diploma program in T&D. It's a Distance program, self-reading and a few sessions in between. My opinion is that it takes Training theoretically.


2. How can one contact right people to start with the T&D ?

For what?

If for getting business, then you need to learn marketing & business development skills and also need to be known for your Training skills.

If for connecting to trainers and sharing & learning, then you need to use linkedin more.


3. What is the scope , future & opportunities in this sector?

I don't see training as a business or a job but more of a passion! And when there is passion, the scope, future & opportunities are the 'zenith'.

If you want to be in this field because you believe in the power of change, then you can for yourself create as many opportunities as you want. If you are here, just because it's a "earning" field, then with every slowdown, recession, you are gonna face 'frustration'.

Comments

Preiti said…
I really like the way you have slotted trainers - Job/Business Trainers as you call them and Paasionate Trainers.

I resonate with the fact that a Passionate Trainer would not like to train for more than 10-12 days in a month. Now that is not because he/she can't train for more no. of days or that work is not available to them.
It is because they are so much in love with what they do ....they beleive in their power and ability to bring change that motivates them to deliver quality training!...One that benefits participants in the long-term.
I guess...I got really passionate about my views here...just as I am about Training !

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